Re: ORGLIST: Perdeutero sucrose monolaurate

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From: Bill Lockley (wjsl$##$innotts.co.uk)
Date: Tue May 19 1998 - 16:20:38 EDT


The alternative might be to utilise the observation that sugars can be
perdeuteriated
using deuteriated Raney nickel in D2O (easily available from Raney Alloy
and NaOD/
D2O). This has been published (I think in the early eighties?, I could
chase it
up if you are interested). The exchange labelling is claimed to take place
with
retention of all stereochemistry via an oxido-reductive mechanism operating
on
the molecule whilst it is adsorbed in a fixed orientation on the nickel
surface. I can't
remember if sucrose was one of the models they used.

Cheers,

Bill Lockley

"Science is golden" Dr Zarkov

----------
> From: David Naugler <dnaugler$##$sfu.ca>
> To: Multiple recipients of list orglist <orglist$##$dq.fct.unl.pt>
> Subject: ORGLIST: Perdeutero sucrose monolaurate
> Date: 18 May 1998 21:45
>
> Reader's of Orglist:
>
> I'm new to this list. I hope my question offends no one.
>
>
>
> Perdeutero lauric acid is available. The only perdeutero sugar that is
> available is perdeutero glucose. My question is this: does any one here
know
> of an enzymic method for linking two glucose molecules to give any
> disaccharide which has chemical properties similar to sucrose? Would the
> use of a linking reagent like a carbodiimide work?
>
> Sincerely,
>
> David Naugler
> Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
> Simon Fraser University
>
>
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